Check out BAMM!

stompoutmalaria:

Just linked another 10 blogs to our BAMM page that you should check out. Read about how volunteers in Senegal are using empty rice sacks to make a difference in malaria (I promise it’s a good one). How volunteers in Ethiopia are working with schools to educate youth on how to protect themselves. How volunteers in Madagascar are turning tea time into an opportunity to spread the word with Tea and Talk Time!

You can see them all at:

stompoutmalaria.org/blog-about-malaria-month

Using rice sacks to illustrate the impact of malaria

Nightwatch Overview (by malarianomore)

It’s 9 o’clock, Senegal! Youssou Ndour wants to make sure you and your family are tucked safely beneath a mosquito net.

Peace Corps Volunteers across Senegal are teaming up with Speak Up Africa and Malaria No More to spread the good word about malaria prevention. Using the NightWatch program, which was developed by Malaria No More, Volunteers are tapping in to the popularity and respect that local and international celebrities enjoy to encourage their communities to sleep under a mosquito net every night.

The NightWatch program pairs a nightly radio broadcast with a curriculum for school children. PCVs across Senegal are hosting radio shows in local languages that supplement the messages of NightWatch, emphasizing the importance of regular use of mosquito nets with skits, call-in quizzes, and health talks. In the mean time, they’re in classrooms working with teachers and helping them teach their students about the symptoms and treatment of malaria.

This is a great example of the type of partnership that’s being facilitated by the Stomping Out Malaria in Africa initiative. Together, we’re going to be ending malaria in Africa.

Why give out nets?

Distribution of bed nets impregnated with a long-lasting insecticide has been a cornerstone of Peace Corps Senegal’s malaria program for years. Nobody who’s ever tried to sleep without one in a mosquito-infested area could doubt how useful these nets are for everyone who possesses one. But there’s a community effect too: when a large number of people in a village are using them, the malaria virus is less easily transmitted from human to human. Less of the malaria parasite being passed around means fewer cases of malaria. Even people who don’t use nets themselves are less likely to get sick!

Peace Corps volunteers beginning their service in a malaria-endemic country often walk into the middle of a debate among older volunteers. Should nets be given out at no cost, or should people be asked to pay a small amount for each net? If families pay a little for each net, some volunteers say, they’re more likely to value them. The nets will be used more consistently, and people will be more likely to maintain them. It’s an investment in the health of their families. Proponents of nets being handed out at no cost worry that asking people to pay for preventative measures is never an effective way of increasing how likely people are to use them. 

In honor of Senegal’s new incoming Health and Environmental Education volunteers, who arrive at the beginning of next Month for the beginning of their training, we’re posting this study by the fantastic researches of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab at MIT. The study concluded that asking people to pay for mosquito nets does not increase how likely they are to use them. It’s a fascinating example of the way formative research can give us the answer to fundamental questions about the validity of our malaria interventions. This is the type of research that helps us serve our communities better.

So welcome to our new Senegal volunteers! Take a look at the PAL study and get ready to join the team. 

Volunteers around Senegal are teaming up with NetWorks, a USAID-funded project whose aim is to prevent malaria by increasing access to mosquito nets and promoting their consistent use. NetWorks staff developed counseling cards for community health workers to use during home visits as a way of guiding families through a conversation about how to properly use and maintain new mosquito nets. Peace Corps Volunteers are currently testing these out in their own communities and teaching their counterparts how to use them successfully. Next up: developing a similar set of cards geared toward teaching about the signs and symptoms of malaria and the importance of seeking treatment quickly. 

Senegal PCV Ian Hennessee, Abby Aldridge of Togo, Susan Vulpas of Mali, Mike Toso of Senegal, and Debrah Lee of Madagascar discuss scaling up classic malaria interventions in their host countries, and what roles Peace Corps Volunteers might be able to play. These volunteers and more came to Senegal for an intensive bootcamp-style training on the science of malaria, its diagnosis and treatment, and new ways to fight it. Today, they’re taking up new positions in their host countries as leaders in the fight against malaria. 
You can read more about the Malaria initiative and bootcamps here.

Senegal PCV Ian Hennessee, Abby Aldridge of Togo, Susan Vulpas of Mali, Mike Toso of Senegal, and Debrah Lee of Madagascar discuss scaling up classic malaria interventions in their host countries, and what roles Peace Corps Volunteers might be able to play. These volunteers and more came to Senegal for an intensive bootcamp-style training on the science of malaria, its diagnosis and treatment, and new ways to fight it. Today, they’re taking up new positions in their host countries as leaders in the fight against malaria. 

You can read more about the Malaria initiative and bootcamps here.

Peace Corps Senegal is hosting Stomping Out Malaria in Africa’s third malaria bootcamp in Thies. Before travelling back to their posts, participants get deep background on the science of malaria, behavior change communication techniques, and successful anti-malaria interventions.
In this photo, bootcamp participants listen to El Hadji Momar Diop discuss losing his young daughter to malaria, and how that experience inspired him and his village of Thieneba Seck to end malaria in their community. Thieneba’s story is an inspiration for Peace Corps Volunteers and community-based organizations across Africa.
Read more about bootcamp and SOMA’s goals.

Peace Corps Senegal is hosting Stomping Out Malaria in Africa’s third malaria bootcamp in Thies. Before travelling back to their posts, participants get deep background on the science of malaria, behavior change communication techniques, and successful anti-malaria interventions.

In this photo, bootcamp participants listen to El Hadji Momar Diop discuss losing his young daughter to malaria, and how that experience inspired him and his village of Thieneba Seck to end malaria in their community. Thieneba’s story is an inspiration for Peace Corps Volunteers and community-based organizations across Africa.

Read more about bootcamp and SOMA’s goals.